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Food Science and Biotechnology
→ Food Science and Biotechnology 2019 ; 28(3): 649-655
Interactions between fecal bacteria, bile acids and components of tomato pomace
Krzysztof Dziedzic1,2, Danuta Górecka3, Artur Szwengiel1, Jan Michniewicz1, Agnieszka Drożdżyńska4, Jarosław Walkowiak2
1Institute of Food Technology and Plant Origin, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Wojska Polskiego 31, 60-624 Poznan, Poland, 2Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolic Diseases, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Szpitalna 27/33, 60-572 Poznan, Poland, 3Department of Gastronomy Science and Functional Food, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Wojska Polskiego 31, 60-624 Poznan, Poland, 4Department of Biotechnology and Food Microbiology, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Wojska Polskiego 48, 60-627 Poznan, Poland
ABSTRACT
The tomato pomace obtained during processing as a residue of tomato processing from large industry. The interactions between tomato pomace and fecal bacteria, bile acids during in vitro digestion were studied. Digestion was carried out by using bioreactor in anaerobic conditions. Tomato pomace can significantly affect the count of fecal bacteria and the solubility of bile acids in in vitro digestion due to bonding ability of their proteins/peptides. The availability and use of bile acids does not only depend on the interactions between bile acids and bacteria, but also the interactions of bile acids with digested food components. Tomato pomace characterized high dietary fiber content and its fractions: 17.64–21.53% for cellulose and 13.48–18.63% for lignin. Given our results we supposed that fecal bacteria can use primary bile acids, as their source of energy in an environment where carbon availability is limited.
KEYWORD
Cholic acid, Deoxycholic acid, In vitro digestion, Lithocholic acid, Tomato waste
Food Science and Biotechnology 2019 ; 28(3): 649-655
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